One thing that might help you move away from food rules based on restriction is mindful eating, which is a way of eating that is centered on being present and engaged not just with your food, but why you’re eating it, and how your body feels. Mindful eating can help people learn how to eat based on what they want and need, as opposed to what they feel they should or shouldn’t eat. Mindful eating isn’t a weight-loss diet, but it can help change your orientation to food and food “rules.”
It takes a multipronged approach to see results in 30 days. Jim advises doing cardio for 30 to 60 minutes, three to five days a week. The goal is to burn 500 calories a day; this can be achieved through cardio, eating in a calorie deficit, and getting in more steps. He also advises strength training two to four days a week. Not only does strength training also burn calories, but it helps build lean muscle, too, which burns more calories at rest.
Which is why it pays to keep your cool. One way to do so: practicing mindfulness. According to a 2011 Journal of Obesity study, women who experienced the greatest reduction in stress by effectively mastering stress-reduction techniques tended to lose the most deep belly fat. So go ahead and take some deep breaths, hit the mat for some anxiety-relieving yoga, or open up one of those guided-meditation apps. Your belly will thank you in the long run.
On the Shred Diet, you’ll eat four meals and up to three snacks a day. Eating smaller meals will keep you from getting hungry as you distribute your calories throughout the day. Equally important, spacing out your meals will keep your hormones stable. When you eat small meals, especially meals composed of foods that have a low-glycemic index (choices that are less likely to spike your blood sugar), you prevent surges in hormones that lead to weight gain.
It’s true that a caloric deficit—burning more calories per day than you take in—is a requisite of weight loss. But creating a deficit doesn’t have to (and shouldn’t) involve deprivation. That goes for calories, carbs, sugar, fat, or any other commonly demonized nutrient. “No one food is responsible for your weight,” Langer says, explaining that a good vs. bad mentality sets people up for disordered eating and exercise habits. In fact, caloric deprivation increases how the brain responds to food, setting you up for binge-eating down the line, according to research from the Oregon Research Institute.
The popular "flat belly diets"embrace much of the wisdom found in eating a Mediterranean diet, which helps everything from brain health to hearth health. The basic premise for both diets is eat foods rich in monosaturated fatty acids (MUFA) that may help reduce your belly fat storage. MUFA-rich foods include olive oil, nuts and seeds, avocodos, and fish. Eating yogurt regularly has also been found to be helpful in reducing belly fat.
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